hamburg

Christmas can be a difficult time for people with epilepsy as there can be triggers that are unique to the season. One example that has been shared by Epilepsy Action is flashing Christmas tree lights.

Flashing Christmas tree lights that are put up by public organisations in the UK, such as local councils, have to comply with health and safety regulations. They should not flash at a rate that could trigger seizures in most people with photosensitive epilepsy.

However, Christmas tree lights that are sold to the public do not have to comply with health and safety regulations. They could flash at any rate, so there is the possibility that they could cause those who live with epilepsy to have a seizure.

This got us thinking about other seizure triggers, as it wouldn’t even occur to those who don’t live with epilepsy that flashing Christmas tree lights and epilepsy could be a problem.

And it is not just Christmas – holidays abroad can be another source of epilepsy triggers that you wouldn’t necessarily encounter in your everyday life. We have put together some information about travelling with epilepsy that might be useful to think about before you go abroad.

Do you have any other tips on travelling with epilepsy that might be useful to others?